High five

A trio of Harrison School District 2 elementary students play the cello during a Nov. 8 rehearsal with the Colorado Springs Youth Symphony’s Mozart Strings Project. [Express photo/Regan Foster]

This is music to our ears.

Harrison School District 2 has partnered with Colorado Springs Youth Symphony to take students on a unique music-education journey.

A program dubbed the Mozart Strings Project lets gifted elementary-aged musicians first learn a stringed instrument and then showcase their newly honed talents. Students rehearse twice per week at Stratton Meadows Elementary School and will play at least three concerts this academic year. Mozart students from throughout the region performed Nov. 20 at Harrison High School.

For the older kids — specifically, middle and high schoolers — the symphony offers the chance to audition for one of several highly selective musical groups. Those who make the cut attend an intensive three-day summer camp and perform in several concerts, including at venues such as the Pikes Peak Center for the Performing Arts.

As students progress through the program, they may also tour throughout Colorado, surrounding states and even abroad. This year, six Harrison High School students were selected to perform with the flagship Youth Symphony, the nationally recognized Pikes Peak Winds and master-level Brass Quintet.

Aside from the anecdotal benefits that come from mastering an instrument and performing — confidence building and self esteem among them — research has shown that music instruction appears to accelerate brain development in young children.

This partnership strikes a chord with us. We look forward to hearing more about the students’ growth and development in their music programs and beyond.

Now, here’s a congratulatory high five to some budding entrepreneurs who we are confident will be making a big impact on the business climate in our community.

On Nov. 9, the THRIVE Network celebrated the success of its Fall Class of 2019 at Springs First Church. In addition to graduating from the intensive program, the dozen graduates introduced guests to their business proposals, which ranged from a Southeast coffee shop to an automotive technology training program.

Finally, last month we wrote about the Council of Neighbors and Organizations’ (CONO) proposal to create a Community Investment Trust in Southeast. In case you don’t recall, if implemented the trust would afford Southeast residents the opportunity invest in community real estate ownership for between $10 and $100 per month.

Now CONO needs your feedback. The organization has launched an 11-question digital survey that seeks to gauge respondents’ financial savvy and interest in the idea. The survey takes just a few moments to complete and can be found online via

Harrison School District 2 has partnered with Colorado Springs Youth Symphony to take students on a unique music-education journey.

A program dubbed the Mozart Strings Project lets gifted elementary-aged musicians first learn a stringed instrument and then showcase their newly honed talents. Students rehearse twice per week at Stratton Meadows Elementary School and will play at least three concerts this academic year. Mozart students from throughout the region performed Nov. 20 at Harrison High School.

For the older kids — specifically, middle and high schoolers — the symphony offers the chance to audition for one of several highly selective musical groups. Those who make the cut attend an intensive three-day summer camp and perform in several concerts, including at venues such as the Pikes Peak Center for the Performing Arts.

As students progress through the program, they may also tour throughout Colorado, surrounding states and even abroad.

This year, six Harrison High School students were selected to perform with the flagship Youth Symphony, the nationally recognized Pikes Peak Winds and master-level Brass Quintet.

Aside from the anecdotal benefits that come from mastering an instrument and performing — confidence building and self esteem among them — research has shown that music instruction appears to accelerate brain development in young children.

This partnership strikes a chord with us. We look forward to hearing more about the students’ growth and development in their music programs and beyond.

Now, here’s a congratulatory high five to some budding entrepreneurs who we are confident will be making a big impact on the business climate in our community.

On Nov. 9, the THRIVE Network celebrated the success of its Fall Class of 2019 at Springs First Church. In addition to graduating from the intensive program, the dozen graduates introduced guests to their business proposals, which ranged from a Southeast coffee shop to an automotive technology training program.

Finally, last month we wrote about the Council of Neighbors and Organizations’ (CONO) proposal to create a Community Investment Trust in Southeast. In case you don’t recall, if implemented the trust would afford Southeast residents the opportunity invest in community real estate ownership for between $10 and $100 per month.

Now CONO needs your feedback. The organization has launched an 11-question digital survey that seeks to gauge respondents’ financial savvy and interest in the idea. The survey takes just a few moments to complete and can be found online via facebook.com/CONO719.

— Regan Foster

To submit an item for the High Five, email a detailed description of the event, including date and location, and photos with identifying information from left to right to features@southeastexpress.org. For more information, call Regan Foster at 719-578-2802.

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